What happens during Alive At 25 Courses?

Fact: Traffic crashes are the leading cause of teen fatalities, accounting for 44% of teen deaths in the U.S.


Vehicle crashes are the #1 cause of death for people between the ages of 16 and 24. The National Safety Council, a leader in driver improvement training for more than 40 years, developed DDC-Alive at 25 to specifically target drivers in this age group.

  • Since 1995, more than 400,000 young adults have learned life-saving defensive driving skills through DDC-Alive at 25
  • In a study conducted by the Colorado State Patrol in 2003, of 1000 random Alive at 25 graduates (500 voluntary and 500 court ordered), 89% of the respondents indicated they believed they would be a safer driver as a result of taking the class and, 92% of the respondents identified that they believed the class helped them improve their driving knowledge and skills. Please remember, half of the respondents did not want to be there and were court ordered, traffic violators.
  • Courts and schools nationwide use DDC-Alive at 25 in their graduated license and violator programs.

This highly interactive program encourages young drivers between the ages of 16 and 24 to take responsibility for their driving behavior. Skill practices and on-the-spot defensive driving techniques help change bravado to confidence.

Our Alive at 25 instructors use personal examples and even humor to get their point across. They use workbook exercises, interactive media segments, group discussions, role-playing, and short lectures to help young drivers develop convictions and strategies that will keep them safer on the road.

Alive at 25 teaches young adults that:

  • People in their age group are more likely to be hurt or killed in a vehicle crash.
  • Inexperience, distractions, and peer pressure cause unique driving hazards.
  • Speeding, alcohol, and “party drugs” greatly increase their risk of injury or death.
  • As a driver or passenger, they can greatly reduce their risk by taking control.
  • Committing to changing their driving behavior makes personal, legal and financial sense.